Best Conversation Starters for the Golf Course

Let’s start this week’s blog with an exercise. Answer the questions below and click submit! Then, read the rest of the blog post to learn how you can be more social and make more connections during a round of golf. 

    Golf Conversations Survey

    How often do you golf? *

    Less than once per month
    1 – 2 times per month
    Once a week
    Twice a week

    Who do you golf with most often? *

    I golf alone
    My significant other
    My friends
    Coworkers or associates
    Other

    If Other please specify: *

    What’s your attitude on conversations during a round? *

    I like absolute silence
    I don’t like talking, but if someone wants to chat I will
    No preference
    I’m ok with small talk
    I like to engage with and meet new people

Some people prefer to have absolute silence while they golf and have absolutely no interest in meeting others. Some people are naturally social and love chatting with new people on the course. Whatever you prefer, you can’t argue that golf has long been a tool for networking. All it takes is sparking up a bit of conversation. 

When I golf with new people, I default to just a few questions to get the round started and keep the conversation honest and fun. Use these few simple conversation starters to amp up your relationship-building on the course. 

1. Are you from around here? 

Asking someone if they are from the area always opens up two routes of conversation to default to. It can either go toward following up about golf courses in the area they frequent or to golf courses in their area you may want to visit. Starting the round or breaking the ice with a question about the other person not only makes them feel special, but it also makes them feel like their opinions matter. And, every really great relationship is about making the other person feel acknowledged and important. In Maslow’s Heirarchy of Needs, I’d say this hits on both esteem and psychological needs, two important parts of human psychology. 

2. Have you played here before?

This question is important for two reasons. It’s a simple enough question that if the other person isn’t too interested in conversation, then they can easily get out. It’s also a great deciding factor for how you both will play together the rest of day. If you’ve played the course before and your partner hasn’t, this is a great opportunity to offer some helpful hints. Let them know that water comes into the fairway a bit more than they think, for example. Likewise, if they’ve played the course before, ask for tips. 

3. What do you do for a living?

This question rarely is asked, but realistically, if you’re trying to make professional connections on the course, then why don’t you ask? Getting down to business about what the other person does for a living is the quickest way to find out if they’ll be helpful to your career now or in the future. Plus, once you open up that conversation, it’s much easier to ask for a business card or pass yours on at the end of a round. 

Good luck and enjoy the conversation out there! 

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